Editorial: Yes, national popular vote


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Posted Online: Oct. 21, 2008, 2:52 pm
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The Dispatch and The Rock Island Argus

With less than two weeks to go before the presidential election, the folks behind the National Popular Vote are turning up the heat on a plan that would reform the Electoral College by eliminating the undemocratic winner-take-all allocation of electoral votes.

Illinois already is one of a handful of states which has approved a National Popular Vote bill. Last spring Gov. Rod Blagojevich signed the measure into law, joining Hawaii, New Jersey and Maryland. Together, the four states have 50 electoral votes. The measure will only take affect when it is enacted, in identical form, by states possessing enough electoral votes to elect a president — 270 of 538.

The bill bypasses the need to amend the constitution by letting states determine how to assign electoral votes. It is an ingenious solution to a vexing problem and, best of all, it follows the dictates of the constitution which allows states to allocate their electoral votes in any way they choose to do so. Indeed, both Maine and Nebraska currently allocate electoral votes by district, not by winner-take-all statewide totals.

Effort to abolish the electors have been going on for decades, but they picked up steam in 2000 when George W. Bush lost the popular vote, but was awarded enough electoral votes to win the election, the fourth time in the Electoral College’s 221-year history that the winner of the popular vote was not elected president. With 55 presidential elections, National Popular Vote (www.NationalPopularVote.com) says, that amounts to a 1-in-14 failure rate. If landslides are excluded from the mix, the candidate with fewer popular votes was elected in 1-in-7 elections. The same thing almost happened again in 2004. If John Kerry had captured Ohio — he needed to take about 60,000 votes from George W. Bush — the incumbent president wouldn’t have been re-elected even though he held a substantial plurality of the votes nationwide.

Backers of the plan say, correctly, that the current system disenfranchises large numbers of Democrats in Republican states and Republicans in Democrat states because of the winner-take-all system that awards all electoral votes to the candidate who wins the state. Indeed, they say, the focus on electoral votes flies in the face of the promise that every vote counts.

The figures from National Popular Vote are startling. In 2004, candidates spent over two-thirds of their money and made campaign visits in just five states; over 80 percent in nine states and over 99 percent in 16 states.

“Under the winner-take-all rule, candidates have no reason to poll, visit, advertise, organize or pay attention to the concerns of states where they are comfortably ahead or hopelessly behind,” the group contends. “Instead, candidates concentrate their attention on a small handful of closely divided ‘battleground’ states. This means that voters in three-quarters of the states are ignored in presidential elections.”

In 2008, the group says, no more than 14 states were ever considered “battleground” states and by October, only six of those states still mattered. “This year as we face another close election, it’s time to reform the current system and do what more than 70 percent of the public has long supported — elect the president by national popular vote,” writes Roger Salazar of National Popular Vote.

We urge Iowa and other states to sign onto the plan so that by the next presidential election, every vote will be counted, and every state will matter in what we hope will be a truly nationwide campaign.














 



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  Today is Saturday, Aug. 2, the 214th day of 2014. There are 151 days left in the year.

1864 -- 150 years ago: Because of the National Fast, no paper will be issued from this office tomorrow.
1889 -- 125 years ago: Attracting considerable attention is a sunflower stalk 15 feet high and still growing in the yard of Dr. C. Speidel on 23rd Street in Rock Island.
1914 -- 100 years ago: The municipal bathing beach proposition came up again at the city commission's meeting and a proposition passed, provided that a locker room be constructed at the foot of 7th Street for the accommodation of the bathers.
1939 -- 75 years ago: Plans for erecting a $14,000 warehouse to replace the frame structure at the rear of the Augustana Book Concern were announced.
1964 -- 50 years ago: Hours for tours of the new Deere & Co. Administrative Center on John Deere Road will be changed, effective Monday.
1989 -- 25 years ago: Tuesday night at the Great Mississippi Valley Fair in Davenport the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band gave its fans more than they possibly could have expected. The band took the stage at 9:07 p.m. and didn't leave until 10:40.









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