LaGrange Highlands names Moline's Dyer as superintendent


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Originally Posted Online: Jan. 29, 2010, 3:19 pm
Last Updated: Jan. 29, 2010, 4:18 pm
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By Nicole Lauer, nlauer@qconline.com
Bob Dyer, a 32-year employee of the Moline School District, is the new superintendent in the LaGrange Highlands School District in the west suburbs of Chicago. He will start his new position July 1.

The LaGrange Highlands school board announced Thursday it's decision to award a three-year superintendent contract to Mr. Dyer, 54, to replace the district's retiring superintendent, Arleen Armanetti.

LaGrange Highland board president Tom Hinshaw wrote in a letter that Mr. Dyer's outlook on education meshes well with the district's mission to ensure every child reaches his or her potential.

He wrote, "Bob's personal motto is "every child succeeds -- no exceptoins, no excuses", a theme very consistent with our mission statement."

Mr. Dyer started his career at Moline High School as a social studies teacher and went on to serve as a Spanish teacher, dean and assistant principal. After 21 years at the high school, he served five years as Willard Elementary principal and has served as an administrator of the district since 2004. His current title is assistant superintendent for curriculum and instruction.

"I've been with Moline for 32 years or 54 because I was born, raised educated and spent my whole life here," Mr. Dyer said.

Mr. Dyer said he loves working in Moline and he has gained many wonderful friends and colleagues, but he could not pass up the superintendent position in LaGrange.

"It was one of those things that kept sticking in my mind," he said. "I thought Iwould at least apply and see what happens and this is what happens."

Mr. Dyer said it will be difficult to move on.

"This is the first time I feel like Iknow what the term bittersweet means."

Moline superintendent Cal Lee called Mr. Dyer a "highly effective administrator" who will be a perfect match for LaGrange, a district he said consists of about 900 students in grades kindergarten through eighth grade with 90 percent of students meeting or exceeding state standards.

"They need someone with a strong curriculum background and Bob absolutely has that,"Mr. Lee said. "He knows about culture and has a great sense of humor. We couldn't be happier for him or more sad for us."




Bob Dyer

Hometown: Moline
Age: 54
Education: bachelor's from Augustana College, master's from University of Illinois, education specialist and doctorate from Western Illinois University
Career: served the Moline School district 32 years, including at the high school, Willard Elementary and Allendale, the district's administration center.















 



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