Editorial: 72nd State Rep. -- Veteran vs. newcomer


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Originally Posted Online: Oct. 26, 2012, 5:00 am
Last Updated: Oct. 31, 2012, 10:46 am
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The Dispatch and The Rock Island Argus

Voters in the race for 72nd District state representative will find two very different choices on their Nov. 6 ballot.

Republican Neil Anderson, a Moline firefighter and political newcomer, faces incumbent state Rep. Pat Verschoore, D-Milan, who has served since 2003 and has been easily re-elected three times. Mr. Verschoore also told us that, contrary to rumors, he intends to serve out the full term. Mr. nderson said he will limit himself to eight years or four terms. Both have run well-organized, clean campaigns though they differ significantly on many issues, particularly money matters.

Mr. Verschoore points to a number of votes he has made to ease pressure on state finances. He supported the temporary income tax increase, and believes it should be allowed to expire in 2014. He believes a combination of growth, reform, education investment and budget cuts is the most effective path to balancing the budget.

Mr. Anderson has signed the Save Illinois Taxpayers Pledge crafted by the For the Good of Illinois political action committee. It calls for freezing local property taxes in Illinois for three years, immediately repealing the 2011 state income and corporate tax increases, and a forensic audit of the state.

Mr. Anderson said Illinois has a corruption problem and the cost of the audit would be trivial compared to the savings it would find. Mr. Verschoore doesn't support a forensic audit without some idea of what investigators should be looking for. Illinois Auditor General Bill Holland said it would take 10 years and at least $150 million to conduct one, he said. He's right, it's a costly gamble without any certain reward.

Though we believe the temporary income tax hike should be allowed to sunset on schedule, unless significant cuts or other money-saving reforms are made, losing that revenue now would only exacerbate Illinois' current untenable financial position. Additionally, a blanket property tax freeze could cripple counties, cities and schools. Their largest expenses are employees and many have already negotiated multi-year union contracts. A property tax freeze could result in significant layoffs and/or loss of services. Mr. Anderson's own experience with efforts to privatize the Moline ambulance service illustrate why such choices must be made at the local level, not in Springfield.

There are, of course, decisions that must be made in the Statehouse which have a direct and lasting impact on a legislator's local community and that is where Mr. Verschoore has shone. Amid the raucous, anything-goes atmosphere in Springfield, he has quietly compiled an impressive list of accomplishments that includes an Amtrak stop, new and better roads, money for local schools and, the crown jewel, Western Illinois University Quad Cities Riverfront Campus.

Mr. Anderson doesn't much resemble the candidate we first met in the Republican primary. He has learned on the run and developed an impressive grasp of the issues. One wonders, however, how effective a new and inexperienced lawmaker of the minority party could be in representing the 72nd District in Springfield.

With tough decisions to be made, capital improvement funds remaining to be doled out, and the Democrats likely retaining control, we believe the district needs Mr. Verschoore's steady hand in Springfield. He is recommended.
















 




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  Today is Wednesday, Sept. 17, the 260th day of 2014. There are 105 days left in the year.
1864 -- 150 years ago: We are told league merchants have paid no attention to the prohibition on selling ammunition, but continue to sell just as before the order was issued.
1889 -- 125 years ago: The Rev. R.F. Sweet, rector of Trinity Episcopal Parish, left for the East to visit his boyhood home in Boston before attending the general convention of the Episcopal Church in New York.
1914 -- 100 years ago: Dr. E.A. Anderson was named to succeed Dr. E.L. Kerns as head physician of the Modern Woodmen of America, and moved to Rock Island from Holdingford, Minn.
1939 -- 75 years ago: One week late, because of the outbreak of war, Dr. E.L. Beyer resumed his work as professor of romance languages at Augustana College. Dr. and Mrs. Beyer left Germany on the last train to the Belgian border.
1964 -- 50 years ago: Employees in Turnstyle stores in Moline and Davenport will vote Oct. 2 in an election set up by the Chicago regional office of the National Labor Relations Board. Employees will vote either for the Retail Clerk International or for no union.
1989 -- 25 years ago: Rock Island High School is considering a step to help teen moms stay in school and get their diploma. The school board is expected to vote tonight on instituting an on-site child care center.




(More History)