Jacobs retains state senate seat


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Originally Posted Online: Nov. 06, 2012, 11:09 pm
Last Updated: Nov. 06, 2012, 11:26 pm
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By Stephen Elliott, selliott@qconline.com

After a contentious race with more than a few accusations and personal attacks by each side, state Sen. Mike Jacobs, D-East Moline, came out on top in Tuesday's race against Republican challenger Bill Albracht.

Sen. Jacobs received 50,671 votes to 41,682 votes for Mr. Albracht.

"I am humbled," Sen. Jacobs said amid a raucous crowd of supporters at the East Moline American Legion. "It's a very gratifying victory and it makes me proud.

"I'm very pleased with all the people who put in so much work for me," he said. "Labor was huge. I will not forget it. Voters in the 36th voted for progress. They voted for jobs. There's a lot of jobs in Jacobs."

Whiteside County voters unofficially chose Sen. Jacobs 11,397 to 8,446.Carroll County went !,401-847 for Sen. Jacobs.

"The rural voters are the strength of Mike Jacobs," he said. "The farmers and people I work with appreciate my frankness."

Both candidates slugged it out on the campaign trail and spent a lot of money doing it. At least $1.7 million was raised in the race since July 1, according to the Illinois Campaign for Political Reform, making it one of the most expensive races in Illinois, attracting significant money from outside groups.

Each accused the other of personal attacks.

"I want to thank Bill Albracht for running," Sen. Jacobs said. "Mr. Albracht attacked me and my family repeatedly. I was offended by that. I wanted to talk about the issues."

Sen. Jacobs said he wants to assist in the progress of Western Illinois University's Quad-Cities' Campus. The senator said he wants to sit down with leaders in the community and set goals.

Mr. Albracht said he was "very appreciative" of the support he received.

"It was truly my honor to be out there in front trying to make a change in Illinois," he said. "We fought a long, hard fight. I'm very proud of what we have done.We're really happy about that part of it, but the people decided on another direction."

He acknowledged the campaign became heated at times.

"Things were said and it got out of context and my positions were exaggerated," Mr. Albracht said. "You know what? It's politics. It's big-boy politics. It's nothing I didn't expect."

Both candidates promised they would serve only two terms in office, which will total six years. Both ran for a two-year term this year.

Mr. Albracht said it's too early to say if he would consider running again.




County-by-County vote for Jacobs-Albracht:


Rock Island: 

33,960 - Jacobs
29,120 - Albracht

Henry:

1,983 - Albracht
 1,975 - Jacobs


Whiteside:

13,335 - Jacobs
  9,732 -  Albracht

Carroll:

1,401 - Jacobs
 847    - Albracht

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