Chicago, Q-C rail service may not be operated by Amtrak


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Originally Posted Online: Nov. 08, 2012, 10:39 pm
Last Updated: Nov. 09, 2012, 12:09 am
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By Dawn Neuses dneuses@qconline.com

MOLINE — Work is underway to launch passenger rail service between Chicago and the Quad-Cities, although Amtrak may not operate the line.

Quad-Citians received an update on the project from the Illinois Department of Transportation Thursday afternoon at an open house at the i wireless Center in Moline. Phase I of the project is well underway, according toJohn Schwalbach, Chicago to Quad-Cities route project manager for the engineering consulting firm of URS.

Phase I work includes preliminary engineering and environmental assessment and impact studies, he said. Final design will begin when that work is completed next winter, he said.

If all goes well, rail work could begin next year in Wyanet about 50 miles east of the Quad-Cities, Mr. Schwalbach said. However, he said, it is more likely work will begin in 2014 and the rail line will open in late 2015.

The route to Moline will follow an existing BNSF railway from Chicago to Princeton, which already serves Amtrak, before connecting to an existing Iowa Interstate Railroad at Wyanet. A connection for the two lines must be built near Wyanet.

Todd Popish, IDOT project manager for the Chicago to Quad-Cities line, said only two miles of track near Aurora needs upgrading. The bulk of improvements would be made on 52 miles of Iowa Interstate Railroad track, allowing the maximum train speed to increase from its current 40 mph to 79 mph.

Other improvements include constructing a rail station in downtown Moline and Geneseo, a lay-over facility in Rock Island, rail yard improvements in Silvis, a second main line track between Rock Island and Silvis and new rail equipment.

Once work is complete, twice daily round-trip service would be offered between Chicago and the Quad-Cities with stops in Geneseo, Princeton, Mendota and Plano.

Mr. Popish said the goal for launching passenger rail service in the Quad-Cities was moved from 2014 to 2015 because planning couldn't begin until Iowa officials decided on service from the Quad-Cities to Iowa City and from there to Omaha. AlthoughIowa is conducting an environmental impact study, there currently are no plans for service to Iowa City or beyond.

Late last year, the Federal Railroad Administration awarded $177.3 million to IDOT for passenger rail service between Chicago and the Quad-Cities. The state also is contributing $45 million.

In May 2011, IDOT received $268 million to buy 48 high performance rail cars and seven quick accelerating locomotives. The new equipment will be used on eight corridors in the Midwest, including the Chicago to Quad-Cities route, according to IDOT.

Although Amtrak is the proposed operator of the Chicago to Quad-Cities passenger rail route, that choice has not been finalized, according toMiriam Gutierrez, IDOT bureau chief for high speed and passenger rail.

This isthe first time the state is buying, and will own, rail cars and locomotives, she said. Usually, the state leases equipment from Amtrak.Because the state will own the equipment, the phone has begun ringing from other passenger rail operators inquiring about running the line, she said.

IDOT has an annual contract with Amtrak for other routes in the state, running from July 1 to June 30, Mr. Popish said. Theoperation of some state passenger rail lines could be put out for bid, he said.

Another open house on the project is planned4-7 p.m. Tuesday at the Geneseo Public Library, 805 N. Chicago St., Geneseo.





Moline station work won't have to wait

Track work can start in Moline the same time it begins east of the Quad-Cities, according to Moline Mayor Don Welvaert.

On Thursday, Mayor Welvaert said officials with the Illinois Department of Transportation officials have told the city track work could begin in Moline at the same time as work near Wyanet, rather than making the Moline part of the project wait on the westward progression of the rail work.

A multi-modal station in Moline has received a $10 million federal grant for construction. MetroLINK, which is overseeing the station construction, must start spending the funds by December and begin construction by March 2013, or the federal contract can be terminated.

The IDOT decision means Moline should be able to meet the federal requirements, Mayor Welvaert said, and prepare for passenger rail service.

"We have to have some design completed in Moline to let us properly place the loading platform," he said. 















 



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  Today is Thursday, April 17, the 107th day of 2014. There are 258 days left in the year.

1864 -- 150 years ago: Journeymen shoemakers of Rock Island struck for higher wages yesterday morning, asking 25 percent increases. Employers have acceded to their demand.
1889 -- 125 years ago: Lighting struck wires of the Merchants Electric Light Co. during a furious storm, and many Rock Island business houses were compelled to resort to gas as a means of illumination.
1914 -- 100 years ago: Members of the First Church of Christ, Scientist, decided to erect a new edifice at a cost of about $60,000.
1939 -- 75 years ago: Willard Anderson, junior forward for the Augustana College basketball team, which won 17 out of 22 contests, was elected captain of the quintet.
1964 -- 50 years ago: John Hoffman, Moline, president of the Sac-Fox Council of Boy Scouts, will be honored for his 50 years in scouting by members of the council at a dinner Thursday evening.
1989 -- 25 years ago: The Quad-Cities has what is believed to be the area's first elite-class gymnast. It's the stuff upon which Olympic competitors are made. Tiffany Chapman, of Rock Island, not only has earned the highest possible gymnast ranking, she won the honor at age 11.






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