LOCAL FOOTBALL SCORING UPDATES PRESENTED BY THE HUNGRY HOBO:

Forget Powerball, Americans already have won life's lottery


Share
Posted Online: Dec. 02, 2012, 6:00 am
Comment on this story | Print this story | Email this story
By Ingrid E. Newkirk
Hope springs eternal, no matter how slim the odds. You can see that in the long lines for Powerball tickets, despite how cold it is outside in most of the 42 states where the jackpot has climbed to hundreds of millions of dollars.

No one can be blamed for wanting to win a windfall that makes "Skyfall," another form of entertainment with long lines, look like a home movie.

With more than $400 million in the bank, you could have a lot of fun, buy a lot of things you need and a lot of stuff you don't, and do an enormous amount of good for those who weren't so lucky, like those poster children with cleft palates, the dogs in animal shelters, impoverished students who ache to go to college, the homeless man who needs a place to hang his hat and tattered coat, and a hopeful inventor in need of a little capital to kick-start her promising idea.

Here's hoping that the odds are in favor of coming Powerball winners who care and want to share.

But even if we don't win the lottery, it's good to remember that in fact, we have all won life's lottery and have good reasons to count our blessings — even those of us who don't think of ourselves as lucky. Someone who has lost a limb in military service or in an accident, say; those of us who have lost our home to a fire or flood; and those of us who can't afford the little luxuries that we would like -- we are all still winners. How so?

When we feel sorry for ourselves, it helps to put things in perspective, to remember that we live in the United States of America, where we have a great many luxuries unknown to most of the world. We don't have to stifle our opinions or get a government-issued pass to travel to another state: We enjoy freedom of speech and freedom of movement.

We are entitled to an education. We do not have to starve or freeze: Someone will provide us with food, shelter and water. If we are down on our luck or out on the street, there are basic support services available from the government and from charities to help us.

And even beyond all of that, we have won life's lottery because we have been born human. Whether you believe we lucked out because of karma or divine intervention or by an accident of birth, just imagine for one moment what life would be like if you had been born a mouse in a laboratory, a dog kept outside on a chain this winter, a bear in a barren enclosure in a roadside zoo or a bird confined to a cage. Just imagine.

This is an appeal to all of us who have won life's lottery by being born into the luckiest 0.0001 percent of life forms: Remember to care and to share, especially during this season of goodwill, Powerball or no Powerball.
Ingrid E. Newkirk is the president of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals; www.PETA.org.
















 



Local events heading








  Today is Monday, Sept. 22, the 265th day of 2014. There are 100 days left in the year.

1864 -- 150 years ago: The board of education has granted Thursday as a holiday for the children, with the expectation that parents who desire to have their children attend the Scott County Fair will do so on that day and save irregularity the rest of the week.
1889 -- 125 years ago: The guard fence around the new cement walk at the Harper House has been removed. The blocks are diamond shape, alternating in black and white.
1914 -- 100 years ago: The Rev. R.B. Williams, former pastor of the First Methodist Church, Rock Island, was named superintendent of the Rock Island District.
1939 -- 75 years ago: Abnormally high temperatures and lack of rainfall in Illinois during the past week have speeded maturing of corn and soybean crops.
1964 -- 50 years ago: Installation of a new television system in St. Anthony's Hospital, which includes a closed circuit channel as well as the three regular Quad-Cities channels, has been completed and now is in operation.
1989 -- 25 years ago: When the new Moline High School was built in 1958, along with it were plans to construct a football field in the bowl near 34th Street on the campus. Wednesday afternoon, more than 30 years later, the Moline Board of Education Athletic Board sent the ball rolling toward the possible construction of that field by asking superintendent Richard Hennigan to take to the board of education a proposal to hire a consultant.






(More History)