Fog, shallow water cited in river deaths


Share
Originally Posted Online: Dec. 05, 2012, 6:15 pm
Last Updated: Dec. 05, 2012, 11:33 pm
Comment on this story | Print this story | Email this story
Related stories
By Anthony Watt, awatt@qconline.com

The October deaths of two men thrown from a boat on the Mississippi River were ruled by a coroner's jury to be accidental.

David P. Slater, 50, of Davenport, and Thomas O. Trainer, 42, of Canton, died Oct. 20 after their boat struck a channel marker near Fairport, Iowa, according to testimony at a Rock Island County Coroner's inquest Wednesday.

Mr. Slater was drowned. Mr. Trainer suffered fatal blunt trauma injuries and is believed to have hit the marker when he was ejected from the boat.

Illinois Conservation Police Officer Tony Petreikis testified that a number of factors may have contributed to the collision -- fog, low morning light, shallow water due to drought conditions and two of the boat's seven occupants in the front of the craft, obstructing the operator's view.

The group entered the water at the Shady Creek boat launch near Fairport and was on its way to hunt from duck blinds on the Illinois side of the river when the crash occurred, according to testimony. The crash happened on the Illinois side of the river, although rescue, recovery and investigation efforts were based on the Iowa side.

Alcohol and other impairing substances are not suspected at this point, Officer Petreikis said, although blood samples from the operator are still being analyzed.Neither Mr. Slater nor Mr. Trainer had signs of alcohol or drugs in their systems, Rock Island County Coroner Brian Gustafson told the jury.

The boat's operator told investigators he was leaning out of the boat and using a spot light to help navigate while struggling with a motor that was not operating properly because of the shallow water, Officer Petreikis said. To keep the boat's propeller out of the mud, the operator also was using a different route than he might have if the water was deeper.

Officer Petreikis said the boat may have been going 15-20 mph when it struck the channel marker comprised of concrete, telephone poles and other materials.

The boat was not overloaded and there were life jackets in the boat, Officer Petreikis said. Because passengers had differing accounts of who was sitting where in the boat, investigators could not determine the seating arrangement when the collision occurred.

Officer Petreikis said the case was still under investigation and he soon plans to submit reports to the Rock Island County State's Attorney's Office, which will determine if any charges are filed.

Related Stories














 



Local events heading








  Today is Thursday, Aug. 21, the 233rd day of 2014. There are 132 days left in the year.

1864 -- 150 years ago: Sheriff McLaughlin had the misfortune to dislocate his right shoulder some days ago when his carriage upset. He is now able to walk about but has a very sore shoulder.
1889 -- 125 years ago: A kindergarten was started in the downtown district of Rock Island with the Misses Dodie Hawes and Grace Knowlton as teachers.
1914 -- 100 years ago: Pope Pius X died in Rome.
1939 -- 75 years ago: Rock Island's new theater was named Esquire.
1964 -- 50 years ago: The J.I. Case Co. plant in Bettendorf will add from 150 to 200 employees by Jan. 1 a spokesman for the company said today. The Bettendorf Works today had a payroll of 1,350, but an increased production schedule will require additional people.
1989 -- 25 years ago: The Illowa Council Boy Scouts of America reached and passed its campaign goal in a drive that began 14 months ago by raising more than $2.2 million for the expansion of Loud Thunder Reservation near Andalusia.






(More History)