LOCAL FOOTBALL SCORING UPDATES PRESENTED BY THE HUNGRY HOBO:

Former Davenport police captain sentenced to 2 years probation after pleading guilty


Share
Originally Posted Online: Jan. 10, 2013, 11:29 pm
Last Updated: Jan. 11, 2013, 12:37 am
Comment on this story | Print this story | Email this story
By Rachel Warmke rwarmke@qconline.com

Former Davenport police captain Kevin Michael Murphy was sentenced Thursday to two years probation after pleading guilty in November to two aggravated misdemeanor counts of stalking.

District Court Judge Thomas G. Reidel also ordered Mr. Murphy, 56, of Bettendorf, to pay a $625 civil penalty for each count and to have no contact with the victim for at least five years.

Mr. Murphy, who retired from the police force in October 2011, also must abstain from alcohol and continue therapy and after-care programs, including Alcoholics Anonymous, the judge said.

If he successfully completes terms of his probation, the charges will be expunged from his record. If Mr. Murphy fails to comply, his deferred judgment could be revoked, and he could face jail time.

Defense attorney Murray Bell told the court that Mr. Murphy's behavior was the result of an alcohol problem and untreated post-traumatic stress disorder, and said now-asst. Davenport Police Chief Donald Schaeffer and Lt. Gene Wall had personal vendettas against Mr. Murphy and bullied the victim into pursuing criminal charges.

Charges filed against Mr. Murphy last February in Scott County, accused him of entering a home in the 1100 block of Hildreth Street, Davenport, on Aug. 11, 2011, and pushing a female resident, and accusing her of having a guest in her home.

Records claimed he re-entered the home on Nov. 10, 2011, while the woman was at home with a guest, and pushed her in an effort to see who was with her.

He entered the home a third time three days later and covered the sleeping woman's mouth with his hand and told her "Don't call the police, and don't file a report," according to records.

The charges claim Mr. Murphy violated an order of protection on Feb. 8 by using another person to lure the woman to him.

Dr. David Wolgin, a psychologist with Psychology Health Group in Davenport testified that he begantreating Mr. Murphy in December, 2011, after Mr Murphy said he was depressed, had relationship issues and "demons in his head that he wanted to get rid of."

He diagnosed Mr. Murphy with PTSD, alcohol dependence and depressive disorder, and said Mr. Murphy's life was riddled with "intrusive memories" and "nightmares" about several traumatic incidents during his time on the police force, including seeing two suicides.

Dr. Wolgin said those incidents prompted feelings of guilt and failure and PTSD, which may have affected Mr. Murphy's behavior and how he viewed the world.

"When you're drunk and you have post-traumatic stress disorder," someone might "not know the line between helping and harassing," Mr. Bell later told the judge.

Mr. Bell said that while Mr. Murphy was on the police force,he discovered nearly 350 sexual assault cases that had never been sent for DNA testing, and brought it to the attention of officers Schaeffer and Wall, but was told to drop the matter.

Mr. Bell also said Lt. Wall blamed Mr. Murphy for the lieutenant's son not being hired by the police department and "bullied" the victim into filing charges against his client."They were after him, and this was their opportunity."

"This is just another baseless allegation that has been made during the course of his criminal case, which has ended with his guilty plea," Davenport Police Chief Frank Donchez said in an email response later Thursday. "No one convicted of stalking has any credibility on sexual assault."

JudgeReidel said that when charges were filed in February, he was "greatly concerned" about Mr. Murphy's alcohol use and well-being and placed severe restrictions on him, including jail time, house arrest and a GPS tracking device.

"You've already received more punishment than a normal citizen would," he told Mr. Murphy, commending him for being "100 percent compliant" with those restrictions.

Mr. Murphy declined comment after leaving the courthouse Thursday.






















 



Local events heading








  Today is Monday, Sept. 22, the 265th day of 2014. There are 100 days left in the year.

1864 -- 150 years ago: The board of education has granted Thursday as a holiday for the children, with the expectation that parents who desire to have their children attend the Scott County Fair will do so on that day and save irregularity the rest of the week.
1889 -- 125 years ago: The guard fence around the new cement walk at the Harper House has been removed. The blocks are diamond shape, alternating in black and white.
1914 -- 100 years ago: The Rev. R.B. Williams, former pastor of the First Methodist Church, Rock Island, was named superintendent of the Rock Island District.
1939 -- 75 years ago: Abnormally high temperatures and lack of rainfall in Illinois during the past week have speeded maturing of corn and soybean crops.
1964 -- 50 years ago: Installation of a new television system in St. Anthony's Hospital, which includes a closed circuit channel as well as the three regular Quad-Cities channels, has been completed and now is in operation.
1989 -- 25 years ago: When the new Moline High School was built in 1958, along with it were plans to construct a football field in the bowl near 34th Street on the campus. Wednesday afternoon, more than 30 years later, the Moline Board of Education Athletic Board sent the ball rolling toward the possible construction of that field by asking superintendent Richard Hennigan to take to the board of education a proposal to hire a consultant.






(More History)