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Proposed RI 5-year plan includes $19M for new police station


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Originally Posted Online: Jan. 14, 2013, 8:46 pm
Last Updated: Jan. 14, 2013, 9:11 pm
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By Eric Timmons, etimmons@qconline.com

A proposed $93.3 million five-year capital improvement plan was unveiled by Rock Island Public Works Director Bob Hawes at Monday's city council meeting.

Included in the plan is $19 million for the estimated cost of building a new police station, which the plan states could be opened by 2016.The plan assumes the project would be financed by issuing bonds that will be paid off with gaming tax revenue.

Mayor Dennis Pauley, in his recent State of the City address, said the police department has outgrown its current building. A site has not been picked for a new building.

The capital improvement plan also would invest millions in the city's street, water and sewer network with funding from a mix of local, state and federal money. The city council has yet to approve the plan but is expected to do so in the coming weeks.

Mr. Hawes presented the plan during a study session on Monday. The proposal calls for $20.7 million in spending on street improvements, $4 million on water system improvements, $48.2 million on sewer network improvements and $750,000 on improvements to the stormwater system.

The $48.2 million earmarked for the city's sewer systemincludes the expansion of wet weather treatment capacity of the Mill Street Sewage Treatment Plant.Once completed, the plant would be able to treat 106 million gallons per day, compared to 16 million now. Construction began in 2011 and will be completed by 2014.

The capital improvement plan is subject to alteration by aldermen before being adopted. Mr. Hawes invited their input and said he expects a vote on the five-year plan in the coming weeks.

In other business on Monday, aldermen approved distributing$526,000 in surplus tax-increment-financing funds to the Rock Island County treasurer for distribution among the taxing bodies.The money comes from the Parkway/I-280 TIF district.

As part of the city's redevelopment agreement with Jumer's Casino and Hotel, the city is required to return 75 percent of TIF revenues generated by the casino project to Jumer's.For the current fiscal year, the amount to be reimbursed to Jumer's is $1.6 million, according to city officials.

The remaining 25 percent of TIF revenues are to be returned to the Rock Island County treasurer as a surplus.TheRock Island Milan School District will receive about $284,083 of that surplus
and Rock Island County will receive $48,183.

The city's agreement with Jumer's runs through fiscal year 2023.

TIF districts are used by local governments to spur development. Any increase in property tax assessments from development within a district is put in a special fund that is used to attract more development, fund infrastructure improvements or repay development costs.





















 



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  Today is Monday, Sept. 22, the 265th day of 2014. There are 100 days left in the year.

1864 -- 150 years ago: The board of education has granted Thursday as a holiday for the children, with the expectation that parents who desire to have their children attend the Scott County Fair will do so on that day and save irregularity the rest of the week.
1889 -- 125 years ago: The guard fence around the new cement walk at the Harper House has been removed. The blocks are diamond shape, alternating in black and white.
1914 -- 100 years ago: The Rev. R.B. Williams, former pastor of the First Methodist Church, Rock Island, was named superintendent of the Rock Island District.
1939 -- 75 years ago: Abnormally high temperatures and lack of rainfall in Illinois during the past week have speeded maturing of corn and soybean crops.
1964 -- 50 years ago: Installation of a new television system in St. Anthony's Hospital, which includes a closed circuit channel as well as the three regular Quad-Cities channels, has been completed and now is in operation.
1989 -- 25 years ago: When the new Moline High School was built in 1958, along with it were plans to construct a football field in the bowl near 34th Street on the campus. Wednesday afternoon, more than 30 years later, the Moline Board of Education Athletic Board sent the ball rolling toward the possible construction of that field by asking superintendent Richard Hennigan to take to the board of education a proposal to hire a consultant.






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