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RI County seeks way to get new courthouse


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Originally Posted Online: Jan. 15, 2013, 9:25 pm
Last Updated: Jan. 16, 2013, 9:46 am
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By Eric Timmons, etimmons@qconline.com

Rock Island County's voters will be asked in April if they support creating a way for the county's public building commission to borrow money to build a new courthouse.

The Rock Island County Board voted on Tuesday to hold a referendum during the April 9 local elections asking voters if they support expanding the commission's authority.By doing so, voters would allow the commission to issue bonds to build a new courthouse and county office building, provided there was support from the county board.

The commission, which is independent of the county, wascreated to finance construction of the Rock Island County Justice Center.

During a closed door meeting on Tuesday, Chief Judge Jeffrey O'Connor spoke to the county board in support of the referendum.He told reporters it was "absolutely essential" the courthouse be replaced, and he said he thought the public would back the move.

For years, judges and some county board members have pushed for either extensive renovations or replacement of the courthouse, which is more than 100 years old.

"It has to be done," Judge O'Connor said. "It can't be pushed aside any longer."

The board voted 20-1 to put the referendum on the April 9 ballot. The lone dissent came from Rock Island County Board member Brian Vyncke, D-Moline, who said the referendum question -- which does not mention building a new courthouse or issuing bonds -- was too vague.

As approved Tuesday, the referendum question asks voters if they support allowing the county board to expand the purpose of the building commission "to include all the powers and authority prescribed by the Public Building Commission Act."

Last year's proposal to build a new county courthouse and office complex at the Quad Cities Industrial Center remains on the table, but has failed to win county board members' support. The development has an estimated price tag of $34 million.

A number of county board members oppose moving the courthouse and county office building out of downtown Rock Island.

Rock Island County Board Chairman Phil Banaszek said financing a new courthouse through the public building commission would likely mean higher property taxes.If the building commission's powers are expanded, it could issue bonds to build a courthouse. The commission then would lease the new courthouse to the county, with the lease covering the cost of paying off the bonds.

Mr. Banaszek said he plans to launch a campaign to inform the public about the process and the need to update the county's aging buildings.He has previously stated the county should seek developers' ideas on a new county complex or renovating the existing properties.




















 



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  Today is Monday, Sept. 22, the 265th day of 2014. There are 100 days left in the year.

1864 -- 150 years ago: The board of education has granted Thursday as a holiday for the children, with the expectation that parents who desire to have their children attend the Scott County Fair will do so on that day and save irregularity the rest of the week.
1889 -- 125 years ago: The guard fence around the new cement walk at the Harper House has been removed. The blocks are diamond shape, alternating in black and white.
1914 -- 100 years ago: The Rev. R.B. Williams, former pastor of the First Methodist Church, Rock Island, was named superintendent of the Rock Island District.
1939 -- 75 years ago: Abnormally high temperatures and lack of rainfall in Illinois during the past week have speeded maturing of corn and soybean crops.
1964 -- 50 years ago: Installation of a new television system in St. Anthony's Hospital, which includes a closed circuit channel as well as the three regular Quad-Cities channels, has been completed and now is in operation.
1989 -- 25 years ago: When the new Moline High School was built in 1958, along with it were plans to construct a football field in the bowl near 34th Street on the campus. Wednesday afternoon, more than 30 years later, the Moline Board of Education Athletic Board sent the ball rolling toward the possible construction of that field by asking superintendent Richard Hennigan to take to the board of education a proposal to hire a consultant.






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