Future champ? Keys continues to impress in Australia


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Originally Posted Online: Jan. 15, 2013, 10:56 pm
Last Updated: Jan. 16, 2013, 12:04 am
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MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA -- Madison Keys may not have had a lot to say during her nationally televised post-match interview after this morning's 6-2, 6-1 stomping of Austria's Tamira Paszek at the Australian Open, but tennis legend Cliff Drysdale said it all.

"We're looking at a future champion," Drysdale said as the interview concluded following Keys' third win in a Grand Slam event and second in three days.

With her 56-minute victory over the 30th-ranked Paszek, the 17-year-old Rock Island native moves into the third round where it gets tougher. She will face Germany's Angelique Kerber, the fifth seed in the women's bracket.

Keys was impressive in her straight-sets win, breaking Paszek's serve three times and serving six aces to none for her opponent. She finished the match in style with an ace serve down the middle.

"I'm just excited and happy that I'm playing well,'' Keys said to ESPN2 after the win. "I hope I can keep it up."

After winning the opening set 6-2, Keys came out rolling in the second set, winning nine of the first 10 points to win on her own serve and then break to go up 2-0.

"It felt good," said Keys when asked what it felt like to be on a roll like that. "I just kind of play and not think about it. At the same time, you know it can change. I just have to stay really focused."

Her big first serve was again key, with a high of 191 KMH (to 157 for Paszek) and an average of 176 KMH (to 141 for her opponent). That helped Keys win 19 of her first-serve points.

"I definitely work on it a lot,' she said of her serve. "There are times when I kind of lose it, but when it's working, it's working pretty well."

And it's not as if her second serve is bad. In fact, she closed out her fifth-game win in the second set with a second-serve ace and won points on 15 of her 23 second serves.

When asked what a weapon her serve is, Keys replied, "It's definitely the most important. When my serve is really working well, even when I'm not playing well, I can still, you know, stay in matches."

She'll be in for a big test in the third round. Kerber advanced this morning with a 6-3, 6-1 win over Lucie Hradecka.

Serena Williams romps on bad ankle:Flat on her back, her sore right ankle raised and her hands covering her face, Serena Williams tried to block out thoughts that her bid for a third straight Grand Slam title might be ruined.

After a dominating run the last six months, Williams was a big favorite to win the Australian Open. Suddenly, though, there seemed a way for her to be gone in the first round.

"I almost panicked, and I thought, 'I can't do that,'" she said. "I just have to really remain calm and think things through."

The stats showed this was nothing more than a stroll — a 6-0, 6-0 wipeout in 54 minutes of No. 110-ranked Edina Gallovits-Hall at Melbourne Park on Tuesday. Williams conceded only six points in the second set.





















 



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