Don't be a dope, lying rarely works


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Posted Online: Jan. 22, 2013, 2:53 pm
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By Loretta LaRoche
Several years ago I watched a very interesting film called "The Invention of Lying." It is based on the premise that no one can lie about anything.

As a result, individuals say whatever they're thinking about anyone or anything, no matter the circumstances. In one scene, two people are on a first date and the suitor asks the woman if she'll go out with him again. Her reply: " Oh, no, I like you, but I can't go out with you again. You're too fat! I need to have a relationship with a handsome, athletic type so my children will look good."

Now, I've been on some dates in my lifetime, and there must've been moments when I had some insensitive thoughts, but I didn't relay them to my date. I'm sure they might have had some insensitive thoughts, too. Thank God they kept their mouths shut.

In the movie, one of the characters discovers lying when a bank clerk gives him too much money when he cashes a check.

Most of us have been given some rules concerning lying by our families or various authority figures.

We've been told that it doesn't serve us to lie, because if we're found out, there could be grave consequences. And we've been told that lying does not build character or help with self-worth.

My school years were spent in Catholic school, and if you were caught lying there was hell to pay. Then your parents were informed and you went through more hell.

There have been many debates about little white lies versus big, fat ones. Sometimes we just don't want to hurt someone's feelings, so we adjust the truth a little. However, it seems that big, fat, juicy lies are becoming more and more a part of this culture.

It's particularly rampant in the sports arena. I have been keeping up with the ongoing stories about Lance Armstrong. He is someone I did several conferences with in Canada.

I listened to his speeches on how he overcame childhood difficulties and cancer, and I was awed by his courage and tenacity. I had my picture taken with him and brought home an autographed picture for my grandson. I even had lunch with his mother.

When I started to read the stories about his doping, I thought, "What a dope!''

As the situation unraveled more and more, his sponsors withdrew and his titles were taken away. Somehow or other Armstrong will survive; he's proven that he's a survivor. My concern is for the people who believed in him.

Maybe the lesson learned will be that you never really get away with anything, because even if you're never found out, one person will know for sure, and that person is you.



















 



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  Today is Thursday, Oct. 2, the 275th day of 2014. There are 90 days left in the year.

1864 -- 150 years ago: The ladies have adopted the fashion of wearing representations of insects in the flowers on their bonnets. Some look very natural.
1889 -- 125 years ago: T.F. Cary, former Rock Island alderman, has accepted a position as salesman for a Chicago wallpaper house and plans to move to that city.
1914 -- 100 years ago: Work on the new telephone building on 18th Street between 6th and 7th avenues is progressing rapidly.
1939 -- 75 years ago: Rock Island's new theater at 3rd Avenue and 19th Street will have a name significant of its location. The "Rocket" is scheduled to open Thanksgiving Day.
1964 -- 50 years ago: Two of Rock Island's newest water towers were vandalized last night, including the one at 38th Street and 31st Avenue, where police took five Moline boys into custody about 9 p.m..
1989 -- 25 years ago: Some of us who live in the Quad-Cities take the Mississippi River for granted, or at least we used to. But the river is not taken for granted by our visitors. And most Quad-Citians are realizing the importance of the river to this area as increased emphasis is placed on tourism.







(More History)