Letter: 2nd grader from Africa pens her own tribute to Dr. King


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Posted Online: Jan. 22, 2013, 2:57 pm
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(Editor's note: After teacher Sarah Drake read her second-grade class a book about Martin Luther King Jr., one of her students, a native of Togo, Africa, was moved to pen a thank you note. Jane Addams School Principal Teresa Landon shared it with us and we're happy to share it with you.)

Thank you, Martin Luther King, Jr. You set me free. If you were never born, I wouldn't be here.

On the bus I would have to stand a lot.

You were a great man. You helped many. You were put in jail and beaten. But you were still calm.

When your people were being beaten, you stayed calm. You taught people not to fight. And in school you got good grades.

Martin Luther King, Jr., you are really my role model.

Merveille Afivi Assiobo,
2nd grade,
Jane Addams School,
Moline

















 




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