You are what you eat -- and how you move!


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Originally Posted Online: Jan. 28, 2013, 11:26 am
Last Updated: Jan. 28, 2013, 12:38 pm
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By Jeff Schnaufer

What you eat and how much can make a major difference in feeling – and being – healthy. Colleen Doyle, director of nutrition and physical activity at the American Cancer Society, makes the following suggestions:
• Read food labels to become more aware of portion sizes and calories consumed. Be aware that "low-fat" or "nonfat" does not necessarily mean "low-calorie."
• Eat smaller portions of high-calorie foods.
•Choose vegetables, whole fruit and other low-calorie foods instead of calorie-dense foods.
• Limit consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages such as soft drinks, sports drinks and fruit-flavored drinks.
•When you eat away from home, be especially mindful to choose food low in calories, fat and added sugar, and avoid consuming large portion sizes.
Exercise is the second part of the equation, experts say.
"Strive to be moderately active for at least 150 minutes each week. Moderately active is equivalent to walking a mile in 15 minutes," Doyle said.
"And look for other ways to incorporate activity into your day – take the stairs, park further from your office door in the parking lot, carry your own groceries out from the store, do leg lifts while you watch TV. Again, make a physically active lifestyle your norm."
Dr. Catherine Loria, nutritional epidemiologist in the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute's Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, said to engage in behavior therapy. This means using tools to monitor your caloric intake and your physical activity; setting goals and finding social support for your weight loss goals.
"Having a buddy who walks with you, who helps you when you have a relapse -- you can help keep each other going," Dr. Loria said.
How much weight should people try to take off? Results seem to appear in as little as five to 10 percent, experts said.
"Modest weight loss like five to 10 percent can reduce blood pressure. There's a very clear relationship," Dr. Loria said.
Interestingly, Dr. Loria said, there have not been a lot of weight loss trials for people over 50. However, the studies that have been done are promising for people over 60.
"People who are 60 and older tend to be better at losing weight," Dr. Loria said. "We don't really know for sure why. We're guessing it's because they are retired and have more time to pay attention to what they are doing."
But what about people who think it's too late to take off the weight because they are too old?
"It's never too late to reduce your risks," Dr. Loria said.

















 




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  Today is Tuesday, Sept 2, the 245th day of 2014. There are 120 days left in the year.

1864 — 150 years ago: It is estimated that 300,000 people attended the recent Democratic convention in Chicago when Gen. George B. McClellan of New Jersey was nominated as a candidate for president of the United States.
1889 — 125 years ago: Alderman Frank Ill, Winslow Howard and Captain J.M. Montgomery returned from Milwaukee, where they attended the national Grand Army of the Republic encampment.
1914 — 100 years ago: Three members of the Rock Island YMCA accepted positions as physical directors of other associations. Albert Cook went to Kewanee, C.D. Curtis to Canton and Willis Woods to Leavenworth, Kan.
1939 — 75 years ago: Former President Herbert Hoover appealed for national support of President F.D. Roosevelt and Congress in every effort to keep the United States out of war.
1964 — 50 years ago: The Rock Island Junior chamber pf Commerce has received answers to about 65 % of the 600 questionnaires mailed out recently in a "Community Attitude Survey" to analyze sentiments of citizens towards their city's various recreational, educational, and civic service programs.
1989 — 25 years ago: The two thunderstorms passing through the Quad Cities last night and early today left some area residents reaching for their flashlights.






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