Augustana announces comprehensive fee


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Originally Posted Online: Feb. 05, 2013, 9:34 am
Last Updated: Feb. 05, 2013, 2:14 pm
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Press release submitted by Augustana College

Augustana announces comprehensive fee and shares how those dollars are put to use

Rock Island, Ill. – Augustana College has announced its comprehensive fee for the 2013-14 academic year. For the coming year, the comprehensive cost will be $44,937—an increase of $513 in each of the three terms—from $43,398 in the 2012-2013 academic year. This is an increase of 3.5 percent.

At the same time the college announced its tuition increase, Executive Vice President Kent Barnds released "The Augustana Story," a document providing a broad array of data and information about inputs, outputs and outcomes at Augustana College. Promising "no fancy words" and "no funny numbers," the document was designed to help parents, guidance counselors, prospective students and others.

Content in "The Augustana Story" is presented in four main areas: information on (1) students, (2) faculty, (3) alumni and (4) finances. Listed under "Our Investment," the financial information includes everything from where tuition dollars are spent to the cost to enroll in a class, and from salary data to the average indebtedness of graduates.

The document says, "Tuition and fees make up the largest source of revenue for Augustana. Two-thirds of tuition dollars goes toward financial aid for our students, in addition to compensation and benefits for the faculty who teach our students and also the administrators and staff who manage and maintain the college for our students."

Barnds explained that the "Augustana Story" is a response for critics and a transparent view of what happens at the residential liberal arts college. As tuition is increased, he recognizes families need to know what they are getting and be assured that Augustana students are engaged on campus and transformed by their experiences.

"We realize it's increasingly difficult to know what to make of higher education. Pundits ask about the value of a college diploma and what's happening on college campuses," said Barnds.

He continued, "At Augustana College, we hold ourselves to high standards of accountability. Because we are proud of what we do and because we want to be more transparent about what we do, we've developed an in-depth profile of the Augustana experience."
View of a video of Barnds and learn more about the "Augustana Story" at www.augustana.edu/x55573.xml.

For more information or to arrange an interview with Barnds, please contact Keri Rursch, director of public relations, at (309) 794-7721 or kerirursch@augustana.edu.




















 



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  Today is Wednesday, April 23, the 113th day of 2014. There are 252 days left in the year.

1864 — 150 years ago: Some persons are negotiating for 80 feet of ground on Illinois Street with a view of erecting four stores thereon. It would serve a better purpose if the money was invested in neat tenement houses.
1889 — 125 years ago: The Central station, car house and stables of the Moline-Rock Island Horse Railway line of the Holmes syndicate, together with 15 cars and 42 head of horses, were destroyed by fire. The loss was at $15,000.
1914 — 100 years ago: Vera Cruz, Mexico, after a day and night of resistance to American forces, gradually ceased opposition. The American forces took complete control of the city.
1939 — 75 years ago: Dr. R. Bruce Collins was reelected for a second term as president of the Lower Rock Island County Tuberculosis Association.
1964 — 50 years ago: Work is scheduled to begin this summer on construction of a new men's residence complex and an addition to the dining facilities at Westerlin Hall at Augustana College.
1989 — 25 years ago: Special Olympics competitors were triple winners at Rock Island High School Saturday. The participants vanquished the rain that fell during the competition, and some won their events; but most important, they triumphed over their own disabilities.




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