Diamond can dress up your garage floor


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Posted Online: Feb. 05, 2013, 10:49 am
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By Sharon Wren, swren@qconline.com
For six years, Diamond Floor Coatings has been helping Quad-Cities businesses and residences protect and enhance their flooring investments.

"We do decorative concrete, epoxy floor, and concrete sealing," says Ed Rathjen, owner and president. The company's clients include industries, retail stores, factories and private homes.

Concrete sealing is more important than one might think, according to Mr. Rathjen. "Normal wear and tear ages it. Driveways have an especially rough time, as road salt and sprays can really damage them," he said.

Sealing a driveway is not a multiday production, he said. "We use a spray sealer. We come in the morning, and by the next day or even that night, you can drive on it."

The products used by Diamond Floor Coatings range from water-based to petroleum-based, and the selection depends on the setting and how the floor is going to be used.

"Epoxy as a floor protectant is becoming more popular -- it's greener and lasts longer, versus vinyl," said Mr. Rathjen. "Applying epoxy on the garage floor protects it. It's easier to clean, like Teflon in a pan. There's less dust and dirt getting dragged in, and nothing can adhere or seep in. That way, you can come in with a leaf blower or squeegee, and it looks like new."

These days, a garage isn't just a place to keep the car and lawnmower, said Mr. Rathjen. "We seem to be living in smaller spaces. If a garage is a clean, nice space, you can use it for hobbies, entertaining, and as a more functional, usable space than just a place to put your car," he said.

"With epoxy, you can do anything under the sun -- colored flakes and logos, for example. The Hawkeyes' colors are really popular," Mr. Rathjen said. One customer wished for a "man cave" in Notre Dame colors, and the company was able to put the team logo on the floor. In another case, Diamond (Floor Coatings) was able to match a gray color from a leather jacket that a customer really liked.

"The stains come in brighter colors or earth tones, like blues, greens and reds. There's not as much variety as paint colors in stains -- like with staining wood, you're at the mercy of the original color and any flaws. Epoxy can cover anything you don't want, like damaged concrete and oil stains," Mr. Rathjen said.

He said he sees floor protection as a natural evolution. "Fifteen years ago, nobody dry-walled and insulated garages. Now they do."
For more information, call (563) 940-0707 or email diamondfloorcoatings@gmail.com.


















 




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  Today is Tuesday, Sept. 16, the 259th day of 2014. There are 106 days left in the year.

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1889 — 125 years ago: J.B. Lidders, past captain of Beardsley Camp, Sons of Veterans, returned from Paterson, N.Y., where he attended the National Sons of Veterans encampments.
1914 — 100 years ago: President Wilson announced that he had received from the imperial chancellor of Germany a noncommittal reply to his inquiry into a report that the emperor was willing to discuss terms of peace.
1939 — 75 years ago: Delegates at the Illinois Conference of the Methodist Church in Springfield voted to raise the minimum pay of ministers so that every pastor would get at least $1,000 annually.
1964 — 50 years ago: An audience of more than 2,600 persons jammed into the Davenport RKO Orpheum theater with a shoe horn feasted on a Miller-Diller evening that was a killer night. Phyllis Diller sent the audience with her offbeat humor. And send them she did! It was Miss Diller's third appearance in the Quad-Cities area.
1989 — 25 years ago: A few years ago, a vacant lot on 7th Avenue and 14th Street in Rock Island was a community nuisance. Weeds grew as high 18 inches. Today, the lot has a new face, thanks to Michael and Sheila Rind and other neighbors who helped them turn it into a park three weeks ago.





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