John Moller


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Posted Online: Feb. 14, 2013, 7:12 pm
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John Moller, 73, passed away on Feb. 13, 2013, at the Clarissa C. Cook Hospice House in Bettendorf. Although John was a strong, active man his whole life, and rumors that he was "bullet-proof" were in fact true, it was cancer that finally did him in.
Friends and family are invited to a memorial service honoring John that will be held at Wheelan-Pressly Funeral Home, 3030 7th Ave., Rock Island, on Saturday, Feb. 16, at 11 a.m. In lieu of visitation, a Celebration of Life gathering will be held following the service at the Rock Island Elk Lodge, 2117 4th Ave., Rock Island, from noon to 5 p.m.
John was born in Rock Island on May 20, 1939, the son of Kathryn and Henry Moller. He went to Rocky High School and in 1957 joined the U.S. Navy, traveling the South Pacific aboard a U.S. Navy Destroyer, serving three years.
After the Navy, John worked as a house painter in his early years and then he worked at John Deere Harvester in various positions, ending as a supervisor. He left Deere in 1980 and bought a business called Cases and Kegs in the Village of East Davenport, which he ran for a number of years. At the same time, John also was fixing up houses to rent, which he continued to this day.
John was a life-long fisherman and boater. His love of boating included everything from kayaking and canoeing to a sailboat, houseboat, cruiser and, of course, a variety of fishing boats, one of his favorites being "The Jed" (as in Jed Clampett), which was as old as he was. Another passion of John's was skiing, which he continued to do throughout last year. He loved to ski the Rocky Mountains, especially "the trees," but sometimes the trees won. He served as president for a while in the heyday of Sitzmachers Ski Club when it boasted a membership of nearly 800 skiers. John loved gardening and enjoyed canning homemade salsa. He was an excellent cook, specializing in pies, which were a work of art. John loved to play euchre his whole life and played in euchre tournaments several times a week in his retirement years.
John was a generous man and devoted to his friends. He truly would give you the shirt off his back if he thought you needed it, or he would help you with any project.
John is survived by his companion of the last 18 years, Susie Goodley; his daughter, Angie Moller, Sarasota, Fla.; his sister, Barbara Johnson (and Guy), Colorado Springs, Colo.; and several nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his sister, Mary; and his parents.
In lieu of flowers, and to reflect his love of the river, memorial donations can be made to Living Lands and Waters or your favorite charity.
Online condolences may be left for the family at www.wheelanpressly.com.












 



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  Today is Wednesday, April 23, the 113th day of 2014. There are 252 days left in the year.

1864 — 150 years ago: Some persons are negotiating for 80 feet of ground on Illinois Street with a view of erecting four stores thereon. It would serve a better purpose if the money was invested in neat tenement houses.
1889 — 125 years ago: The Central station, car house and stables of the Moline-Rock Island Horse Railway line of the Holmes syndicate, together with 15 cars and 42 head of horses, were destroyed by fire. The loss was at $15,000.
1914 — 100 years ago: Vera Cruz, Mexico, after a day and night of resistance to American forces, gradually ceased opposition. The American forces took complete control of the city.
1939 — 75 years ago: Dr. R. Bruce Collins was reelected for a second term as president of the Lower Rock Island County Tuberculosis Association.
1964 — 50 years ago: Work is scheduled to begin this summer on construction of a new men's residence complex and an addition to the dining facilities at Westerlin Hall at Augustana College.
1989 — 25 years ago: Special Olympics competitors were triple winners at Rock Island High School Saturday. The participants vanquished the rain that fell during the competition, and some won their events; but most important, they triumphed over their own disabilities.




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