Health digest for Feb. 19, 2013


Share
Posted Online: Feb. 18, 2013, 10:09 am
Comment on this story | Print this story | Email this story
((with FactFictionF19.jpg; no cutline))
CHECK IT OUT
Separating weight-loss fact from fiction
Millions of American adults use dietary supplements to lose weight, but with hundreds of products on the market, how do you determine which to choose?
Here are some myths and facts about weight loss and weight-loss supplements that may help you cut through the clutter:
Fiction: You can lose weight fast -- and keep it off.
Fact: It takes time to lose weight safely, and keep it off. Losing a pound or two per week is an excellent rate of weight loss. If you lose any more than that, it is very likely that the weight loss will not be permanent. It also often means you are losing water and lean muscle mass, not the desired fat mass.
Be cautious about promises of quick results, such as "lose 10 pounds in one week" or "this celebrity sprinkled her way to weight loss." If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.
If you're unsure about a product, ask your doctor or pharmacist.
Fiction: You have to give up your favorite foods.
Fact:It is very hard to stick to diets, especially fad diets. Instead, simple changes work, including portion control (eating less) and moderate exercise.
Fiction: All weight-loss supplements are the same.
Fact: There are no magic pills, but there are a few (very few) good ones. Look to see if there are scientific studies behind it and whether they have been published in a scientific journal, or if there isclinical evidence for the formulation they are selling.
Be wary of side effects. Many supplements on the market contain stimulants. Avoid products with excessive levels of caffeine, which can cause increased heart rate and elevated blood pressure. Others cause gastrointestinal problems because they block the fat from entering your body.
Check the label: If a supplement does not identify its ingredients or calls them a "secret formulation," steer clear.
-- GateHouse News Service


((with SalmonF19.jpg; no cutline))
TRY THIS
Five foods for diabetes control
If you think you need to eliminate some appealing foods to manage your type 2 diabetes, health experts can put your mind at ease.
Here are five foods to help you thrive:
1. Nuts
"These are one of my favorite foods to recommend," said Toby Smithson, registered dietitian, spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.
The fat, dietary fiber and protein in nuts helps you feel satisfied. Choose your favorite variety of raw or roasted nuts, and if you're watching your sodium intake, avoid salted nuts, said Smithson.
Because of the calorie count, limit your intake to a quarter-cup a day, said Angela Ginn, registered dietitian, from Baltimore, Md.
2. Citrus fruits
You probably know oranges, lemons and limes are high in vitamin C.Citrus fruits also have a practical culinary role."Use citrus juice as a flavoring and cut back on salt," said Ginn.





 












 



Local events heading








  Today is Thursday, April 24, the 114th day of 2014. There are 251 days left in the year.

1864 -- 150 years ago: We learn that it is a contemplation to start a paper mill in Rock Island during the summer by a gentleman from the East.
1889 -- 125 years ago: The gates of Oklahoma were swung open at noon today, and a throng of more than 30,000 settlers started over its soil.
1914 -- 100 years ago: The Iowa Coliseum Co. was incorporated with $40,000 capital and planned a building on 4th Street between Warren and Green streets in Davenport.
1939 -- 75 years ago: Plans are being discussed for resurfacing the streets in the entire downtown district of Rock Island.
1964 -- 50 years ago: Some 45 jobs will be created at J.I. Case Co.'s Rock Island plant in a expansion of operations announced yesterday afternoon at the firm's headquarters in Racine, Wis.
1989 -- 25 years ago: Gardeners and farmers cheered, but not all Quad-Citians found joy Saturday as more than an inch of rain fell on the area. Motorists faced dangerous, rain-slick roads as the water activated grease and grime that had built up during dry weather.








(More History)