Moline to discuss airport land annexation


Share
Originally Posted Online: Feb. 18, 2013, 5:45 pm
Last Updated: Feb. 18, 2013, 5:45 pm
Comment on this story | Print this story | Email this story
By Dawn Neuses, dneuses@qconline.com

MOLINE -- Aldermen on Tuesday night will review a proposed agreement with the Metropolitan Airport Authority of Rock Island County that calls for the city to annex land in return for installing water, sewer and roads for airport tenants.

Aldermen, sitting as the committee of the whole, will meet at 6:30 p.m. on the second floor of city hall, 619 16th St.

According to council documents, the 20-year agreement allows the airport to remain autonomous and unincorporated while providing for "cooperation in continuing development of the southwest corner of the airport property...."

According to the agreement, theairport will allow Moline to annex the Hampton Inn, 2450 69th Ave., and the property to the west where a Holiday Inn Express is proposed.

Moline will design and install sanitary sewer, water and lift stations to the new hotel; a proposed airport car-rental facility; and an expansion at the airport's industrial park, as well as build service roads and provideother access to the city utilities, which the airport will maintain, according to the agreement.

After the properties are annexed, Moline will receive new property taxes, utility taxes and water, sewer and sanitary sewer revenue. It also will retain 2 percent of a 7 percent hotel motel tax it levies on every overnight stay, which goes into city's general fund.

The city uses the remaining 5 percent of the hotel motel tax to provide grants to events that promote tourism.

The properties to be annexed are currently in Rock Island County, which levies a hotel motel tax on overnight stays at the Hampton Inn, with the approximately $138,000 collected annually given to Niabi Zoo.

According to council documents, Moline has an agreement with the county to continue giving that portion of the hotel motel tax to Niabi Zoo for 20 years.

In other business, aldermen are scheduled to review a $1.4 million contract with Valley Construction to reconstruct 5th Avenue, from 11th to 14th streets. This is third, and final, section of 5th Avenue to be reconstructed.

The downtown Special Service Area -- in which property owners pay additional property tax for improvements and maintenance -- will pay $210,000 toward the project.The SSA also is pledging to spend $290,000 on street lights, benches and trash receptacles, bringing the total project cost to $1.72 million.

Mayor Don Welvaert also is expected to ask aldermen to approve his appointment of Dick Brown to be 4th Ward alderman to fill the unexpired term of Ted Ronk who resigned Jan. 8 because he was moving out of the ward.

Mr. Brown was the only person to file candidacy papers for the seat in the April 9 election.














 



Local events heading








  Today is Tuesday, July 22, the 203rd day of 2014. There are 162 days left in the year.

1864 -- 150 years ago: Everybody is invited to go on a moonlight excursion next Monday evening on the steamer New Boston. The trip will be from Davenport to Muscatine and back.
1889 -- 125 years ago: The mayor and bridge committee let a contract to the Clinton Bridge company for a $1,125 iron bridge across Sears canal near Milan.
1914 -- 100 years ago: Injunction proceedings to compel the Central Association to keep a baseball team in Rock Island for the remainder of the season were contemplated by some of the Rock Island fans, but they decided to defer action.
1939 -- 75 years ago: The first of the new and more powerful diesel engines built for the Rock Island Lines for the proposed Chicago-Denver run, passed thru the Tri-Cities this morning.
1964 -- 50 years ago: The Rock Island Rescue Mission is negotiating for the purchase of the Prince Hall Masonic Home located at 37th Avenue and 5th Street, Rock Island.
1989 -- 25 years ago: Quad Cities Container Terminal is being lauded as a giant business boon that will save several days and hundreds of dollars on each goods shipment to the coasts. The Quad Cities Container Terminal is the final piece of the puzzle that opens up increase access to world markets, Robert Goldstein said.








(More History)