Holocaust educator nets coveted humanity award


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Originally Posted Online: April 05, 2013, 6:10 pm
Last Updated: April 08, 2013, 12:34 am
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By Leon Lagerstam, llagerstam@qconline.com

The Yom HaShoah Committee of the Quad Cities will present its Richard A. Swanson Hope for Humanity Award to Ida Kramer, former Jewish Federation of the Quad Cities executive director and longtime Holocaust educator, during Sunday's Holocaust Remembrance ceremony.

The award only has been presented six times in the 32-year history of the remembrance, most recently in 2008 to Alan Egly, executive director of the Doris and Victor Day and Rauch Family Foundations.

Ms. Kramer, born May 20, 1926, in Philadelphia, graduated from the Philadelphia High School for Girls at age 16, in 1942. During World War II, she worked at the Franklin/Philadelphia Arsenal. She married Herbert Kramer, Dec 2, 1945, and moved to the Quad-Cities in 1948.

She has three children, Jeanette Kadosh, of Haifa, Israel, Phillip Kramer, of St. Louis, and Becky Bender, of Buffalo Grove, Ill.; six grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren.

Ms. Kramer previously was a Scott County Democratic Party volunteer and was appointed as Scott County auditor in the 1950s

She was the first female executive director of the Jewish Federation of the Quad Cities in 1986 and served for 15 years until retiring in 2001.

Ms. Kramer remains closely involved in the Jewish Federation by serving on its board of directors, including as board president from 2008 to 2011.

She also was a regional board member and past president of Hadassah, a member of Beth Israel's sisterhood and a board member of the University of Iowa's Hillel and the Iowa State Jewish Community Relations Committee.

Ms. Kramer has been involved in many community activities, such as reading to the blind through a program sponsored by WVIK radio, serving as Rock Island YMCA treasurer and belonging to Federal Emergency Management Assistance System and the Community Council Service boards. She also once was appointed to a Mayor's Media Roundtable on Diversity and Social Equity in Davenport.

"Ida Kramer has been one of the driving forces for a good for many years in our community," Jewish Federation executive director Allan Ross said. "She brought energy, compassion, knowledge and caring to everything she was involved with.

"From making sure seniors were well taken care of to teaching children the important lessons of the Holocaust to helping ensure Israel's survival as the homeland of the Jewish people, Ida has been at the forefront of all of these. It's been an honor to be her friend."

Holocaust education, and financially and spiritually supporting the state of Israel, are two of what Ms. Kramer considers her most important hallmarks.
















 



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  Today is Thursday, July 24, the 205th day of 2014. There are 160 days left in the year.

1864 -- 150 years ago: The Rev. R.J. Humphrey, once a clergyman in this city, was reported killed in a quarrel in New Orleans.
1889 -- 125 years ago: The Rock Island Citizens Improvement Association held a special meeting to consider the proposition of consolidating Rock Island and Moline.
1914 -- 100 years ago: The home of A. Freeman, 806 3rd Ave., was entered by a burglar while a circus parade was in progress and about $100 worth of jewelry and $5 in cash were taken.
1939 -- 75 years ago: The million dollar dredge, Rock Island, of the Rock Island district of United States engineers will be in this area this week to deepen the channel at the site of the new Rock Island-Davenport bridge.
1964 -- 50 years ago: The Argus "walked" to a 13-0 victory over American Container Corporation last night to clinch the championship of Rock Island's A Softball League at Northwest Douglas Park.
1989 -- 25 years ago: The Immediate Care Center emergency medical office at South Park Mall is moving back to United Medical Center on Sept. 1. After nearly six years in operation at the mall, Care Center employees are upset by UMC's decision. The center is used by 700 to 800 people each month.








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