Floodwaters pushing record levels, part of U.S. 150 closed


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Originally Posted Online: April 20, 2013, 9:47 pm
Last Updated: April 21, 2013, 11:51 pm
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By Laura Anderson Shaw, landerson@qconline.com

U.S. 150 from Route 6 to Indian Bluff Road behind the airport has been closed because of flooding. The on-ramp from I-280 to I-74 and Airport Road also was under water this morning,

The Corn Crib Nursery is hosting its Earth Day weekend open house until 4 p.m. today. To get there, take the Milan Beltway off of Blackhawk Road towards Milan. Then go east on Indian Bluff Road to Rt. 150 and turn right on 150 to the Corn Crib.

Story from Saturday night:

While the murky waters of the Rock River are pushing record high levels, there is a light at the end of the flooded tunnel: The waters are expected to crest Sunday, according to the National Weather Service.

As of about 8:30 p.m. Saturday, the Rock River at Moline reached 16.14 feet, more than 4 feet above the 12-foot flood stage, according to NWS meteorologist Andy Ervin. Waters are expected to crest this afternoon around 16.3 feet, Mr. Ervin said, barely beneath the all-time record-high crest of 16.38 feet set during an ice jam flood on March 6, 2008.

Saturday night, the Rock River at Joslin reached 18.86 feet, more than 4 feet above the 14-foot flood stage, Mr. Ervin said. Here, waters are expected to crest at 19.1 feet by around 7 a.m. this morning, narrowly missing the 19.24 all-time record-high crest set on June 7, 2002.

The Mississippi River at Rock Island, where flood stage is 15 feet, reached 19 feet Saturday night. Waters here are expected to crest early Monday morning around 19.7 feet, Mr. Ervin said.

"Luckily and thankfully, we are not approaching a record (high crest) on the Mississippi," Mr. Ervin said, adding that that record was set at 22.63 feet in 1993.

Mr. Ervin said Rock River waters should hold their crests for about a day before falling, and from 24 to 36 hours on the Mississippi. Because the Mississippi is a big river, Mr. Ervin said, "it takes a little while to go up and a little while to go down."

In the mean time, Mr. Ervin said any time river levels reach near-record highs, levees could be over-topped or breached. Folks living near a levee system need to be "very aware" of what is going on, he said.

Saturday, there was a breach in the earthen dike behind the Barstow trailer park, requiring its residents to be evacuated to a temporary shelter provided by the American Red Cross at Eagle Ridge School, 2002 Eagle Ridge Drive, Silvis, according to a statement from Rock Island County Board Chairman Phil Banaszek.

According to the statement, emergency crews placed a dirt barrier on Barstow Road in an attempt to keep the water from getting into the downtown Barstow area.

Mr. Ervin said there is a chance of rain Sunday, and a quarter- to three-quarters-of-an-inch of rain is expected Monday. This would potentially delay the fall of the rivers, Mr. Ervin said, not cause waters to rise.

















 



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  Today is Thursday, April 24, the 114th day of 2014. There are 251 days left in the year.

1864 -- 150 years ago: We learn that it is a contemplation to start a paper mill in Rock Island during the summer by a gentleman from the East.
1889 -- 125 years ago: The gates of Oklahoma were swung open at noon today, and a throng of more than 30,000 settlers started over its soil.
1914 -- 100 years ago: The Iowa Coliseum Co. was incorporated with $40,000 capital and planned a building on 4th Street between Warren and Green streets in Davenport.
1939 -- 75 years ago: Plans are being discussed for resurfacing the streets in the entire downtown district of Rock Island.
1964 -- 50 years ago: Some 45 jobs will be created at J.I. Case Co.'s Rock Island plant in a expansion of operations announced yesterday afternoon at the firm's headquarters in Racine, Wis.
1989 -- 25 years ago: Gardeners and farmers cheered, but not all Quad-Citians found joy Saturday as more than an inch of rain fell on the area. Motorists faced dangerous, rain-slick roads as the water activated grease and grime that had built up during dry weather.








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