Rock River in Moline sets flood record; more rain tonight


Share
Originally Posted Online: April 22, 2013, 12:01 am
Last Updated: April 22, 2013, 10:18 am
Comment on this story | Print this story | Email this story
By Jonathan Turner, jturner@qconline.com

The Rock River in Moline set a new flooding record on Sunday, cresting at 16.52 feet, according to National Weather Service meteorologist Andy Ervin. The previous record was 16.38 feet (flood stage there is 12 feet), set during an ice-jam flood on March 6, 2008.

Flooding on the Rock has been worse than the Mississippi River, Mr. Ervin said, even though Davenport's LeClaire Park is underwater, and Modern Woodmen Park is surrounded by floodwaters.

Flood warnings continue this week for both rivers, with the Rock at Moline expected to fall to 14 feet (still above flood stage) by Friday, Mr. Ervin said. At Joslin, the river crested Sunday at 19.13 feet,narrowly missing the 19.24 all-time record crest set on June 7, 2002, he said. The Rock River is predicted to remain steady around 19.1 feet, then fall to 16.5 feet Thursday.

"At this point, the Rock will be slower to fall (than the Mississippi)," Mr. Ervin said. "We're going to be spending at least another 24 hours really close to the levels we have now. We may yet set another record level."

The Mississippi flooding has not approached record levels, the meteorologist said. In Rock Island, Sunday's crest was 19.1 feet (flood stage is 15 feet). The record Mississippi crest was 22.63 feet at Rock Island on July 9, 1993. The Mississippi at LeClaire crested Saturday at 12.57 feet (flood stage is 11 feet) and fell slightly Sunday, Mr. Ervin said. LeClaire's record flood was 17.75 feet on April 28, 1965, which combined snow melt up north and rain, he said.

The Mississippi this week will remain above major flood stage, with slow falling levels, and heavy rains north of the area (including southern Wisconsin) have added to flooding, Mr. Ervin said. At Moline, the month of April has brought a total rainfall of 6.78 inches so far, compared to a normal of 2.43 inches through April 21, he said.

On Sunday, areas of the East Lawn housing addition in Barstow (along the Rock River), and Falcon Farms trailer park in Port Byron (along the Mississippi) were evacuated because of flooding, said American Red Cross spokeswoman Kasey Kelly. Residents were brought to a temporary Red Cross shelter established Saturday at Eagle Ridge School, 2002 Eagle Ridge Drive, Silvis. The shelter is staffed by disaster workers, offering information, meals, snacks and emotional support, Ms. Kelly said.

On Saturday, residents were evacuated from the River Oaks Mobile Home Park in Barstow U.S. 150 from Route 6 to Indian Bluff Road behind the Quad City Airport was closed because of flooding. And the I-74 West on-ramp from I-280 East was closed due to flooding.

The weather forecast today calls for mostly cloudy with a chance of rain (20 percent) in the afternoon. It is expected to be overcast with thunderstorms and rain showers, in a 60-percent chance of rain tonight.



















 



Local events heading








  Today is Thursday, April 24, the 114th day of 2014. There are 251 days left in the year.

1864 -- 150 years ago: We learn that it is a contemplation to start a paper mill in Rock Island during the summer by a gentleman from the East.
1889 -- 125 years ago: The gates of Oklahoma were swung open at noon today, and a throng of more than 30,000 settlers started over its soil.
1914 -- 100 years ago: The Iowa Coliseum Co. was incorporated with $40,000 capital and planned a building on 4th Street between Warren and Green streets in Davenport.
1939 -- 75 years ago: Plans are being discussed for resurfacing the streets in the entire downtown district of Rock Island.
1964 -- 50 years ago: Some 45 jobs will be created at J.I. Case Co.'s Rock Island plant in a expansion of operations announced yesterday afternoon at the firm's headquarters in Racine, Wis.
1989 -- 25 years ago: Gardeners and farmers cheered, but not all Quad-Citians found joy Saturday as more than an inch of rain fell on the area. Motorists faced dangerous, rain-slick roads as the water activated grease and grime that had built up during dry weather.








(More History)