States shouldn't curb women's health care


Share
Posted Online: April 25, 2013, 3:03 pm
Comment on this story | Print this story | Email this story
By Cecile Richards
Every woman, no matter what her ZIP code is, should have access to affordable, quality health care. It seems like a simple enough proposition, but for far too many women, it is far from true -- and for some, it is becoming less so every day.

Across the country, bills are moving through state legislatures that limit women's access to health care. Legislation has been introduced in 42 states that would ban or severely restrict access to abortion, make it harder for women to get birth control, cut women off from cancer screenings, or prohibit sex education programs that help prevent teen pregnancy.

What is most concerning for Planned Parenthood as a health care provider is that these bills are passing in states where there already is very little access to health care for women.

Unfortunately, my home state of Texas offers a glimpse into what the future may look like for women in many other states if politicians continue their attacks on women's access to health care.

Texas leads the nation in the rate of uninsured -- one in three Texas women of reproductive age doesn't have insurance. And yet, two years ago, the Texas legislature slashed the budgets for publicly funded family planning, which has cut access to preventive care like birth control and cancer screenings for approximately 160,000 women each year. These cuts also forced at least 53 women's preventive health centers to close.

As a result, according to a recent study in the New England Journal of Medicine, the most reliable contraceptive methods, such as IUDs and implants, are less available to women due to higher upfront costs. "We are witnessing the dismantling of a safety net that took decades to build and could not easily be recreated even if funding were restored soon," the authors of the study write.

This dismal reality in Texas should not become the reality for women in other states. Shutting down health centers and limiting access to affordable birth control, lifesaving cancer screenings and testing and treatment for sexually transmitted diseases only increases unintended pregnancy and makes it harder for women to stay healthy.

It's a shame that in the states where the need for health care is greatest, the efforts to further restrict it are the fiercest.
Cecile Richards, president and CEO of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America, wrote this for the Progressive Media Project.
















 



Local events heading








  Today is Tuesday, July 22, the 203rd day of 2014. There are 162 days left in the year.

1864 -- 150 years ago: Everybody is invited to go on a moonlight excursion next Monday evening on the steamer New Boston. The trip will be from Davenport to Muscatine and back.
1889 -- 125 years ago: The mayor and bridge committee let a contract to the Clinton Bridge company for a $1,125 iron bridge across Sears canal near Milan.
1914 -- 100 years ago: Injunction proceedings to compel the Central Association to keep a baseball team in Rock Island for the remainder of the season were contemplated by some of the Rock Island fans, but they decided to defer action.
1939 -- 75 years ago: The first of the new and more powerful diesel engines built for the Rock Island Lines for the proposed Chicago-Denver run, passed thru the Tri-Cities this morning.
1964 -- 50 years ago: The Rock Island Rescue Mission is negotiating for the purchase of the Prince Hall Masonic Home located at 37th Avenue and 5th Street, Rock Island.
1989 -- 25 years ago: Quad Cities Container Terminal is being lauded as a giant business boon that will save several days and hundreds of dollars on each goods shipment to the coasts. The Quad Cities Container Terminal is the final piece of the puzzle that opens up increase access to world markets, Robert Goldstein said.








(More History)