Local animal shelters beyond capacity


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Posted Online: July 09, 2013, 11:05 pm
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By Seth Schroeder and Jonathan Turner
The Animal Aid Humane Society and Quad City Animal Welfare Center are bursting at the seams.

Patti McRae, executive director of Animal Welfare Center, said the shelter at 724 W 2nd Ave., Milan, has space for about 90 cats and 37 dogs, and they've been at, or close to, capacity for the past few months. Since it's a no-kill shelter, she said they can't take additional animals if they are at capacity.

Vickie Sanders, president of the Animal Aid Humane Society, 239 50th St., Moline, said the shelter has about 100 homeless cats and kittens, although they typically have a capacity for about 60.

"The Quad-Cities is in need of more animal shelters," she said. "There is not enough room for all the animals that people are calling for us to take."

Ms. Sanders said a lot of people want to get rid of their pets."It's very sad that the animals can't be placed. The owners may euthanize them due to nowhere to take them."

Ms. McRae said shelters seem fuller during the summer, which might be because pets are outside more often.

She said animal center workers don't question people who drop off pets."Every releaser has a story. A lot of it is financial."

When the center is at capacity and unable to take an animal, Ms. McRae said they try to help offset the cost of taking care of the pet, such as food, spay or neuter services and vaccinations.

For people still unable to take care of their pets, Ms. McRae said they should post the information on social media to get the word out that they're seeking a home for the pet. However, they shouldscreen anyone interested in adopting their pet to ensure they can provide good care.

It's illegal to abandon a pet, and pets running at large can cause traffic problems and create other nuisances, Ms. McRae said.

Ms. Sanders said the Moline Animal Aid is offering a 2-for-1 cat adoption special through July 31. Cat adoptions are $40.

Shelter hours for the Animal Aid Humane Society are from 1 to 5 p.m. Monday and Wednesday, 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday, and 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. For more information, call 309-797-6550.

Hours for the Quad City Animal Welfare Center are from noon to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday, noon to 6 p.m. Wednesday and noon to 4 p.m. Sunday. For more information, call 309-787-6830.

The Rock Island County Animal Care and Control Shelter, 4001 78th Ave., Moline, couldn't be reached for comment. Its hours are noon to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and noon to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. For information, call 309-558-3647.

























 



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  Today is Monday, Sept. 22, the 265th day of 2014. There are 100 days left in the year.

1864 -- 150 years ago: The board of education has granted Thursday as a holiday for the children, with the expectation that parents who desire to have their children attend the Scott County Fair will do so on that day and save irregularity the rest of the week.
1889 -- 125 years ago: The guard fence around the new cement walk at the Harper House has been removed. The blocks are diamond shape, alternating in black and white.
1914 -- 100 years ago: The Rev. R.B. Williams, former pastor of the First Methodist Church, Rock Island, was named superintendent of the Rock Island District.
1939 -- 75 years ago: Abnormally high temperatures and lack of rainfall in Illinois during the past week have speeded maturing of corn and soybean crops.
1964 -- 50 years ago: Installation of a new television system in St. Anthony's Hospital, which includes a closed circuit channel as well as the three regular Quad-Cities channels, has been completed and now is in operation.
1989 -- 25 years ago: When the new Moline High School was built in 1958, along with it were plans to construct a football field in the bowl near 34th Street on the campus. Wednesday afternoon, more than 30 years later, the Moline Board of Education Athletic Board sent the ball rolling toward the possible construction of that field by asking superintendent Richard Hennigan to take to the board of education a proposal to hire a consultant.






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