What's your stop-drop-and-sing song?


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Originally Posted Online: Aug. 22, 2013, 6:44 pm
Last Updated: Aug. 22, 2013, 11:37 pm
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By John Marx, jmarx@qconline.com

The song begins to blare from a wedding DJ's speakers.

There is a scramble, mainly to see whose phone camera is locked and loaded. You want to know who will be catching you making a fool of yourself.

Finally, you bust out a big "Who cares?'' and go for it.

If you are lucky, an empty bottle is available to sing into, and a white tablecloth is at the ready for wrapping toga-style about your waist and shoulders. Thank goodness the Maui Jim sunglasses never leave your side.

Dressed the part, you start to sing -- loudly and poorly -- into the empty bottle.

"Louie, Lou-ieeee. Oh, no, me gotta go.'' For the four minutes the song lasts, you're reliving the movie "Animal House." You love it, and you couldn't care less if anyone else loves it.

We all have one song that makes us stop and sing -- and sometimes dance. Or, as supermodel Brooklyn Decker puts it in the movie "Just Go With It," we all have "my jam.''

For me, it's "Louie, Louie,'' written in 1955 by Richard Berry and made famous by the Kingsmen. Since the day three decades ago when I first saw the movie "Animal House," "Louie, Louie'' has been locked in my brain.

While "Louie, Louie'' will send me in search of a fake mic, a possible toga and dark sunglasses, I also stop and sing whenever I hear Garth Brooks' "Friends in Low Places.'' And here's a tip: If you want to embarrass any 10-year-old riding in your car, power up your iPod and sing along with good ol' Garth.

My third stop-drop-and-sing song is "Shout'' by Otis Day and the Knights (written by the Isley Brothers), also from "Animal House." I do, however, refuse to drop to the ground and do the worm as they did in the movie. Dry cleaning costs too much.

There are other songs I will stop and sing along with -- "Sweet Caroline" comes to mind -- whether I know the lyrics or fake the words as so many of us do. But I only dance and sing to "Louie, Louie'' and "Shout.''

Laugh if you will, but it beats the hand-in-hand skipping routine to "Come on Eileen,'' by Dexys Midnight Runners, performed by my pals Jamie, a 5-foot-10-inch, 285-pound former college lineman, and Ky, once a Marine, always a Marine, who is 6-feet-5 and close to 250 pounds. It is memorable each time it happens, and it has happened a lot in the 20 years I have known both of them.

I know there is a song for everyone, one that will make make even the stuffiest of shirts kick up his or her heels. What's yours? Share it with me at jmarx@qconline.com, and down the road a stretch, I will list some of the favorites.

And don't be shy. If your "jam'' (not my word) is played anywhere, stop, drop and rock. Grab your fake mic and let it ride.


Columnist John Marx can be reached at 309-757-8388 or jmarx@qconline.com. 
















 



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  Today is Friday, July 25, the 206th day of 2014. There are 159 days left in the year.

1864 -- 150 years ago: Walter Jones, of Co, F 23rd Ky, volunteers, lost a satchel on the Camden road, yesterday, containing his papers of discharge from the army.
1889 -- 125 years ago: E. W. Robinson purchased from Mrs. J.T. Miller the livery stable on the triangle south of Market square.
1914 -- 100 years ago: A municipal; bathing beach was advocated at the weekly meeting of the city commission by commissioner Rudgren, who suggested the foot of Seventh Street as an excellent location.
1939 -- 75 years ago: Floyd Shetter, Rock Island county superintendent schools, announced teachers hired for nearly all of the 95 rural and village grade schools in the county.
1964 -- 50 years ago: The mercury officially reached the season's previous high of 95 about noon today and continued upward toward an expected mark of 97.
1989 -- 25 years ago: Fort Armstrong hotel once the wining and dining chambers of Rock Island's elite is under repair. Progress is being made though at a seeming snail's pace to return the building to a semblance of its past glory for senior citizen's homes.








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