LOCAL FOOTBALL SCORING UPDATES PRESENTED BY THE HUNGRY HOBO:

Preservationists offer hope for old school, bridge


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Posted Online: Sept. 04, 2013, 10:04 pm
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By Kevin Smith, ksmith@qconline.com
ROCK ISLAND – Local historical societies on Wednesday asked an Illinois lobbying group what can be done to preserve sites in Moline and Rock Island.

Landmarks Illinois met with about a dozen preservationists to discuss which historically significant sites are most at risk of demolition and to offer advice on possible solutions.

Multiple members of the audience named Audubon School in Rock Island as one such site. Fareway Stores had talked to the Rock Island/Milan School District about buying the site to demolish the building and build a grocery story, but those plans have fallen through.

Joe Lemon Jr., and his father, Joe Lemon, have said they are willing to pay $475,000 for the property but have yet to formalize the offer.

Landmarks Illinois representatives offered a gleam of hope for those worried about the school, stating there have been numerous successful adaptive reuse projects centering on old schools.

"It's a job that can be done," saidFrank Butterfield, director of the organization's field office in Springfield, who added his group was familiar with the school. "They're (schools) kind of like an anchor for the community."

Reusing school buildings can increase the surrounding area's tax base and spur redevelopment, he said.

Audience members also discussed the possible demolition of a pedestrian bridge to Syvlan Island that was closed earlier this year over safety concerns.

On Friday, the Moline Park Board voted to demolish the bridge and replace it. Arecent structural engineering report said replacing the bridge would cost $1.2 million, but repairing it would cost $1.8 million.

Landmarks Illinois agents said they were unfamiliar with the bridge, but Bonnie McDonald, president of the group, said her organization has previously sent engineers to reassess the cost or similar projects.

"When demolition is mentioned, it catches our attention," she said.

Getting a second opinion on the bridge's repair costs resonated with Norm Moline, of Rock Island, who serves on the advisory council for the National Register of Historic Places in Illinois. Mr. Moline said he thought it was a shame to let such a gorgeous piece of land go to waste, given Sylvan Island's historical significance.

Landmarks Illinois receives its funding through donations and membership dues. Each year, the group compiles a list of the Ten Most Endangered Historic Places in Illinois. Past lists have included a handful of Quad-Cities landmarks, such as the decommissioned train depot in Moline and the now-demolished Lincoln School in Rock Island.





















 



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  Today is Monday, Sept. 22, the 265th day of 2014. There are 100 days left in the year.

1864 -- 150 years ago: The board of education has granted Thursday as a holiday for the children, with the expectation that parents who desire to have their children attend the Scott County Fair will do so on that day and save irregularity the rest of the week.
1889 -- 125 years ago: The guard fence around the new cement walk at the Harper House has been removed. The blocks are diamond shape, alternating in black and white.
1914 -- 100 years ago: The Rev. R.B. Williams, former pastor of the First Methodist Church, Rock Island, was named superintendent of the Rock Island District.
1939 -- 75 years ago: Abnormally high temperatures and lack of rainfall in Illinois during the past week have speeded maturing of corn and soybean crops.
1964 -- 50 years ago: Installation of a new television system in St. Anthony's Hospital, which includes a closed circuit channel as well as the three regular Quad-Cities channels, has been completed and now is in operation.
1989 -- 25 years ago: When the new Moline High School was built in 1958, along with it were plans to construct a football field in the bowl near 34th Street on the campus. Wednesday afternoon, more than 30 years later, the Moline Board of Education Athletic Board sent the ball rolling toward the possible construction of that field by asking superintendent Richard Hennigan to take to the board of education a proposal to hire a consultant.






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