DeBrock Galleria showcases work of 30 artists


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Posted Online: Nov. 17, 2013, 9:01 pm
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By Claudia Loucks, cjloucks@qconline.com
GENESEO --Unusual and eclectic creations can be found at DeBrock Galleria.

Wendy DeBrock, Geneseo, recently opened the doors to the art gallery at 106 N. State St. in downtown Geneseo. Opening a gallery has been a "longtime" dream for Mrs. DeBrock.

"For many years, I have wanted to promote the work of artists that I felt were not receiving recognition. I wanted to be able to showcase their work, and I have been following many of these artists for years and keeping up with them so that one day I might be able to offer them the chance to be displayed in a gallery," she said.

DeBrock Galleria represents the work of 30 artists from eight states.

"We have fine arts and artisans' creations that range from weaving, tie-dye, Raku pottery, hand-blown glass, photography, jewelry, handmade pens, and handmade journals," Mrs. DeBrock said. "We have things that have never been seen in Geneseo. People need to stop in and look at the interesting variety of fine arts."

An artist herself, Mrs. DeBrock primarily specializes in painting -- from windows to furniture, as well as on canvas. She also makes jewelry and enjoys working with textile arts, she said.

"I do make kimonos, aprons and a variety of things that I plan to display in my shop in the near future."

She said she has "always had the idea" of opening a shop.

"I have been an artist for almost 50 years and have had extensive retail experience," she said. "And I thought I could combine that with the work of other artists to make something fabulous."

In addition to her creative talent, Mrs. DeBrock, at the age of 40, earned a degree in business administration from Pacific University, Forest Grove, Ore. Although she is experienced in the retail field, Mrs. DeBrock credits her husband, Ron, for his help in opening the Galleria.

"He has been such a huge help," she said. "He has done all the left-brain things that, as an artist, I don't want to mess with. ... All the stuff you have to have in business. He has been wonderful. I can do the creative stuff, but he has been the business manager."

Mr. DeBrock is employed as night editor at The Dispatch and The Rock Island Argus.

Mrs. DeBrock said the biggest obstacle in opening the Galleria was finding all the right people and all the right work.

"Two weeks ago, I made a 2,500-mile trip to Arkansas and back to gather several works of several more artists to bring back for the Galleria."

DeBrock Galleria is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays and from noon to 4 p.m. Sundays. For more information, call the Galleria at 309-944-1533 or visit its website at debrockgalleria.com. The art gallery also is on Facebook.

















 



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  Today is Wednesday, April 23, the 113th day of 2014. There are 252 days left in the year.

1864 — 150 years ago: Some persons are negotiating for 80 feet of ground on Illinois Street with a view of erecting four stores thereon. It would serve a better purpose if the money was invested in neat tenement houses.
1889 — 125 years ago: The Central station, car house and stables of the Moline-Rock Island Horse Railway line of the Holmes syndicate, together with 15 cars and 42 head of horses, were destroyed by fire. The loss was at $15,000.
1914 — 100 years ago: Vera Cruz, Mexico, after a day and night of resistance to American forces, gradually ceased opposition. The American forces took complete control of the city.
1939 — 75 years ago: Dr. R. Bruce Collins was reelected for a second term as president of the Lower Rock Island County Tuberculosis Association.
1964 — 50 years ago: Work is scheduled to begin this summer on construction of a new men's residence complex and an addition to the dining facilities at Westerlin Hall at Augustana College.
1989 — 25 years ago: Special Olympics competitors were triple winners at Rock Island High School Saturday. The participants vanquished the rain that fell during the competition, and some won their events; but most important, they triumphed over their own disabilities.




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