Posted Online: April 23, 2013, 11:05 am

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Photo: GateHouse News Service
Grilled citrus shrimp, an easy recipe to make and enjoy.
Photo: McClatchy Newspapers
In "Pepper: A History of the World's Most Influential Spice," by Marjorie Shaffer, she thoroughly examines our culinary friend.
Mr. Tidbit: Waffles and Topping
New from Kellogg's Eggo empire (which turns out almost as many new versions as Kraft's Oreo dominion) are Eggo Drizzlers, which seem to be regular Eggo waffles plus topping packets (blueberry or strawberry).
For the same price as regular Eggo waffles (10 in a 12.3-ounce box), the 10.7-ounce box of Drizzlers contains just six waffles (which on Mr. Tidbit's postal scale weigh the same as regular Eggos) and three little (1.1-ounce each) packets of topping. Mr. Tidbit's first thought was that Drizzlers seemed like a way to charge too much for waffles.
At one store, regular Eggos and Drizzlers both cost $2.99. So a serving of two of the six Drizzlers waffles and one of the three topping packets costs $1.
If you bought the Eggos in the regular 10-waffle package, plus a 12-ounce bottle of Smucker's blueberry syrup ($2.99 at that store), that serving would cost 87 cents (60 cents for two waffles and 27 cents for 1.1 ounces of syrup). Mr. Tidbit must admit the 13-cent premium isn't as much as he expected.
— Star Tribune (Minneapolis) (MCT)

Easy Recipe: Grilled Citrus Shrimp
1 1/2 pounds fresh jumbo shrimp
1/3 cup fresh grapefruit juice
1/4 cup fresh orange juice
2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro
1/4 cup chopped fresh mint
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
Peel and devein shrimp, leaving tails intact. Combine grapefruit juice, orange juice, lime juice, cilantro, mint, salt and pepper in shallow glass dish. Add shrimp; toss well. Marinate, covered in refrigerator for 30 minutes. Drain shrimp, discard marinade.
Arrange shrimp evenly on four metal skewers. Spray grill rack with nonstick cooking spray. Place skewers on rack. Grill, with grill lid down, over medium-hot (350 to 400 degrees) coals for 3 minutes per side or until shrimp turns pink. Serve over cooked rice.
— More Content Now

Pepper's history spiced with dark moments
The next time you grind a little black pepper on your steak, think about this: The pepper trade was responsible for thousands of deaths, the enslavement of countless others, the establishment of the opium trade in India and the extinction of the dodo. Now, enjoy your dinner.
Marjorie Shaffer, a science writer and editor at the New York University School of Medicine, thoroughly examines our culinary friend in "Pepper: A History of the World's Most Influential Spice" (St. Martin's Press).
Pepper was used by the Greeks, Romans and Chinese for medicinal purposes. In medieval times it was used as currency, at times worth more than gold or silver. And the pepper trade, with its substantial import duties, contributed mightily to the treasury of a fledgling United States.
Pepper, a dried berry from a vine indigenous to India, is a tropical plant and won't grow just anywhere. Columbus didn't sail from Spain looking for Ohio. Shaffer tells us that Columbus carried peppercorns with him to show natives he encountered what exactly he was looking for.
Today, pepper is more than a kitchen staple. Researchers are studying its medicinal properties, and it has shown promise in the treatment of a variety of problems. So the Greeks, Romans and Chinese were on to something.
— Chicago Tribune (MCT)